Road closures during world cup in Cape Town

Road closures for Cape Town Stadium and surrounds during the World Cup have been announced.

On non-match days, for the full duration of the event, the following roads in the vicinity of the stadium will be closed or will have restricted access:

– Granger Bay Boulevard
– Fritz Sonnenberg Road
– Vlei Road
– Fort Wynyard Street
– Ebenezer Road between Port Road and Prestwich Street

In the city centre, Darling Street between Adderley Street and Buitenkant Street, together with the side roads feeding into Darling, will be closed for the full duration of the event to facilitate the activities associated with the FIFA Fan Fest on the Grand Parade.

On match days, the roads listed below will be closed to the general public, including freight and delivery vehicles, from seven hours before the scheduled kick-off, until approximately four hours after the final whistle, depending on security considerations:

– Hertzog Boulevard
– Heerengracht and Adderley Street between Coen Steytler and Strand Street
– Hans Strijdom Avenue
– Western Boulevard up to Beach Road in ThreeAnchorBay
– Sections of Waterkant Street and Riebeeck Street
– Somerset Road from Buitengracht to Ebenezer Road
– Sections of Bree Street, Long Street and Loop Street around Waterkant Street

Rebel World Cup gig on the cards

Legendary musician Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse is leading a drive by angry local musicians to stage a rival concert on the same night as Fifa’s World Cup kick-off celebration.

http://www.mg.co.za/article/2010-03-26-rebel-world-cup-gig-on-the-cards

Choose your team wisely – Music Exchange 2010

http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/432/46070.html

Christina Aguilera new album details

FIVE TIME GRAMMY AWARD WINNING RECORDING ARTIST CHRISTINA AGUILERA TO RELEASE NEW ALBUM “BIONIC” SUMMER 2010

FIRST SINGLE “NOT MYSELF TONIGHT” WILL PREMIERE ON CHRISTINAAGUILERA.COM AT 6PM EDT ON 3/30, IMPACTS RADIOON 4/5 AND WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE ON iTUNES ON 4/13

(New York – NY– March 25th, 2010) – With 30 million albums sold worldwide and the prestigious honor of being the only artist under the age of 30 included in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 greatest singers of all time, 5 time Grammy Award winner Christina Aguilera has already achieved an unprecedented level of success. Aguilera’s been hard at work in the studio for the past year and is pleased to announce the release of her highly anticipated 4th studio album Bionic (RCA Records) this summer. The first single from Bionic is the fiercely energetic anthem “Not Myself Tonight”, produced by Polow Da Don. The song will premiere on ChristinaAguilera.com at 6pm EDT on 3/30, impacts radio on 4/5 and will be available on iTunes on 4/13.

Bionic features songs co-written by Aguilera along with her much buzzed about collaborations including Sia, Tricky Stewart, Polow Da Don, Le Tigre, Hill & Switch, and Ladytron among others. Aguilera notes, “Working on this album with so many talented artists and producers that I admire was really an amazing experience. The artists I chose to work with added so many unique sonic layers to Bionic. My intention was to step into their world and what they do combined with my own vision and sound. The results were magic.” The album also features a ballad produced and written by Linda Perry titled “Lift Me Up”. The title Bionic reflects Aguilera’s ability to take her range to new levels and use her voice in various ways never heard before.

Aguilera describes the album as a unique mix of many genres and styles of music, “I was able to explore and create a fresh, sexy feel using both electronic and organic elements with subject matter ranging from playful to introspective. I am so excited for my fans to hear the new sound. It is something I don’t think anyone will expect.”

In addition to completing the album which was all recorded from her home studio after the birth of her first son, Christina also completed production on her first film, “Burlesque.” The film, which co-stars Cher, Stanley Tucci, and Kristen Bell will be released by ScreenGems this fall.

Guiding principles for successful musicians – Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse

An artist in the South African music industry has plenty to contend with, such as: funding, venues, minimum support from media outlets, international counterparts taking centre stage. Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse addressed the delegates on day one, 22 March, of the 2010 Music Exchange conference discussing why SA musicians are not resilient enough in the industry and hardly ever gain recognition and the rewards for their efforts.

Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse

Exceptions to the rule

Two years down the line, new musicians start disappearing from the South African industry according to Mabuse. Exceptions to the generalisation, however, include Prime Circle and The Parlotones which, in absentia, received resounding applause for their efforts. So what makes the circumstances of these bands different to others who certainly encountered the same obstacles in climbing the success ladder?

Postive relationships

One of the obstacles Mabuse faced was when his band, Harari (formerly known as the Beaters), split and with his “youthful zest, passion and perseverance”, he made the choice of sticking it out and going solo. He was momentarily insecure, but managed to establish great relationships with those involved in his career and pulled through this tough patch. “It is the relationships we establish with others that determine whether the music lives longer,” says Mabuse. The moral of the story being to surround yourself with positive people who believe in you and your capabilities – people who will stand by you through those rough times when your music career looks bleak. For this, Mabuse says, he is very “grateful to the people from Gallo”.

Burn Out in the bag

During the creation of Burn Out (1985), which he describes as being given to him by his ancestors, Mabuse says the idea arrived in his head and he started playing it on the piano, creating layer after layer. It took him an hour to write, after which he called Peter Gallo, describing Gallo as “the kind of recording executive you love to have”, and said to him: “It’s in the bag.”

Embrace self-management

Artists must trust their inner creativity, but it’s equally important to be self-reliant and independent and invest in oneself: “It is important that we create our own independence in the industry. You have to first self-manage; the talent you have is your own and you share it with others,” says Mabuse. Artists need to, in the beginning stages of their careers, go out there and book their own gigs, and realise that they are running their own business and not rely on promoters – they should embrace self-employment.

Tim Lester, a musician present at day one of the conference, asked how one gets past throwing in the towel when encountering challenges. Mabuse acknowledged that these things happen and determination and the way one handles challenges determines whether one survives or not, and that you can only rely on yourself.

Leadership principles

Mabuse, co-winner of the 2005 SAMA Lifetime Achievement Award, proposed three guiding principles for musicians to adhere to steadfastly: sacrifice, dedication and commitment. The three principles, he noted, freedom fighters for human rights used during their struggle.

For more information, go to www.musicexchange.co.za.

From BizCommunity

Remember to bring demos, business cards etc tomorrow – this is your opportunity to NETWORK! :)

Remember to bring demos, business cards etc tomorrow – this is your opportunity to NETWORK! :)

www.musicexchange.co.za

speakers are all in town

Just had amazing pre function at Café Sofia..

Sipho Hotsitx Mabuse and all the speakers heard some great music from stereotype records

Thank you

Hotstix is still burning

Sipho ‘Hotstix’ Mabuse has always been surrounded by music. As a child be was fasinated by the drums. At school he formed a band, called The Beaters, that eventually became the internationally renowned Harare. As a multi-instrumental solo artist he scored what must be South Africa’s first crossover hit with 1985’s ‘Burn Out’. And since his days as a pop star with afro and leather jacket, he’s reimagined himself as a recognised jazz muso, producer, music commentator, and regular performer at Nelson Mandela 46664 concerts. On 22 March he is the keynote speaker at the second Music Exchange Conference in Cape Town.

Full article at Entertainment Africa

http://waz.co.za/10vV

For The Love Of Music

By Jason Curtis

Music Exchange celebrates its second anniversary on 22 and 23 March when the Protea Victoria Junction Hotel, Greenpoint once again plays host to South Africa’s only independent annual music conference.

With its focus squarely on growing and celebrating the music industry and all who play there, Music Exchange is all about opening doors and welcoming dialogue around all things beat centric. Be they musicians, publishers, promoters, song writers, retailers or simple fans, this year’s conference is set to offer participants a veritable feast of opportunity to gleam insight from some of the most successful and respected players in the local and international music arenas.

Along with an already impressive line-up of guest speakers, the biggest coupe for Music Exchange founder and organiser Martin Myers is the inclusion of TouchTunes Interactive Networks Chief Executive Officer Charles Goldstuck who will deliver the conference’s keynote address.

South African born and educated, Goldstuck will be flying in from New York specifically to give the audience his vision and insight into a business that he’s suitably well qualified to speak on. Add music icon and South African Music Award Lifetime Achievement Award lariat Sipho “Hotstix”Mabuse, SAMRO Chief Executive Nick Motsatse, Jake Larsen Head of Music, Nokia Middle East and Africa, Nick Matzukis (music attorney ) and Yoel Kenan (Keevision and Africori founder )amongst others and combined the two day event and special third day workshops are all set to push the impressive boundaries set at last year’s inaugural event.

Goldstuck, a qualified charted accountant and active philanthropist is happy to have accepted the invitation to come home and offer his insights into a business he continues to help grow on a global scale. Before launching TouchTunes in the United States, he sat as the President and Chief Operating Officer of the Bertelsmann Music Group (U.S.), a then division of Sony Music Entertainment. He also, along with industry mogul Clive Davis, started J Records in 2000, home to the likes of Alicia Keys. “I’m excited to see the level of support and interest in South Africa around music in general,” he says. “Music Exchange is a rare opportunity for those invested, at whatever level, in the business of music to look, listen and share at a time when the general perception is that the music industry is in the most precarious place it’s ever been in since recorded music was first made and sold.”

Without giving away just what he intends delivering in his keynote speech on the day, Goldstuck hints at how he perceives the lay of musical land from where he sits in New York, his chosen home since 1985. Having launched TouchTunes, a web based Jukebox system now successfully deployed in over 4000 sites across North America, 2010 will take his company and the technology it employs into the Far East and Australia, leaving him upbeat about the road ahead. “I don’t share the view that the [music] industry is in perpetual trouble. I see a different scenario. Yes we’re definitely in for a few more interesting years ahead, but thereafter the trajectory upward will return,” he foretells.

Fresh from playing at The Motherland Tour at Sun City earlier this month, alongside Yvonne Chaka Chaka and Lira , Sipho Mabuse, as another of the esteemed guest speakers, will deliver the opening address. As an icon and musical ambassador for South Africa and its rich cultural heritage Mabuse is keen to see music lovers unite in injecting new direction into a market that can only grow from the Music Exchange initiative. “In 2011 I celebrate my 50th year as a professional musician,” Mabuse informs. “I owe a great deal to the place that afforded me a career to this day and that’s taken me all over the world. Music continues to give me joy great joy that’s only equalled by that which family offers.”

“Music is a gift,” Goldstuck adds. “As such it’s all in how it’s delivered and just how desirable and great the songs are.” An echoed sentiment first delivered by last year’s keynote address by Stuart Rubin. “That will continue to see fans happily spending their recessionary rands on product they attach a real value to.”

As Steve Jobs grows his Apple orchard and iPads, iPhones and the digital domain in general continues to mature at a rate of knots, the business of music and the makers of hot hit singles need to adapt to the technology that’s captivating and cultivating new audiences everywhere. “In 2001 iTunes did not exist,” Goldstuck points out. “There was no commercially viable digital or e-commerce model at all. And yet, in under a decade, it’s responsible for of a billion legitimate downloads – bought and paid for by the fans. There is so much real opportunity out there right now, not only for artists and music lovers, but for the broader business, to become more involved in capitalising on mobile’s extraordinary take up in this market. Couple that with the impending arrival of true broadband in South Africa and you’ve got a tried a tested formula that simply needs to be replicated. If not by the major record companies then a smart forward thinking independent.”

Add the likes of audio streaming giants Pandora in the US and Spotify in the UK and Europe and the true potential of music penetration into the 14-million-strong South African mobile market becomes a very healthy proposition for any venture capitalist keen to see a return on his or her investment. “Consumption will escalate,” Goldstuck enthuses. “With that comes the opportunity for band and business alike to monetize the medium to the collective good of maker and lover of what’s on sale. This will perpetuate the continued creation of fresh, original music that the world is clearly keen to spend money on – especially of you all the traditional barriers no longer exist.”

In line with the digital theme delegates will also have the opportunity to upload their demo material on www.musicexchange.co.za. Their tracks will then be published, in streaming format. along with a band photograph and biography, giving fledgling artists exposure to the industry experts.

Goldstuck, as with Myers, along with Larsen, Lacey, Kenan and “Hotstix” are all singing off the same choir sheet. From last years sold-out conference it’s clear that the cliché ‘you don’t choose music, it chooses you’, couldn’t ring more true for each and every one of these pioneers who, note-for-note are rewriting the great South African songbook.

Tickets cost R900 and are available online at: www.webtickets.co.za

Music Exchange 2010 Programme

DAY 1 –
MONDAY 22 MARCH 2010

Schedule Detail
9.45am
Opening Welcome

Karl
Gostner,
General Manager, Primedia, Cape Town (94.5Kfm and Cape
Talk)

10am
to 10:45am
The passion of music

Sipho
“Hotstix” Mabuse,
Former, Current and Future

Musician

Why is it that musicians don’t stay
around for long enough to reap the rewards from their efforts?
Sipho “Hotstix” leads us through five decades of love,
passion and faith in the dream.

10.45am Break
11:00am
to 12:00am
An overview of the global
music industry

Charles
Goldstuck
CEO of TouchTunes Interactive Networks. Former President
and COO of the Bertelsmann Music Group (US), a division of Sony Music
Entertainment

A Q&A session covering an overview
of the current worldwide music industry, the challenges facing independency
and the opportunities rising from the ashes. (Moderated by Martin Myers)

12:00am
to 12:40pm
Producers, Songwriters
and the life blood to your hits

What happens in studio, how to get
the best out of your time in studio, what does the engineer, the producer
and the songwriter deliver (should you even consider co-writes?

(Moderated by Peter Lacey))

  • Brian O’Shea (Saron
    Gas, Sugardrive, Arno Carstens)
  • Aron Turest-Swartz (Freshlyground)
  • Gabi Le Roux (Engineer/Producer)
  • Theo Crous (Producer/Songwriter)

12:40pm
to 12:50pm
10 tips to breaking international

Yoel
Kenan,
CEO Africori, former Senior Vice President International
Marketing BMG, former CEO mp3.com

12:50pm
to 2pm
Lunch
2:00pm
to 2:45pm
Needle-time, the inside
job

Nicholas
Motsatse,
CEO South African Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO).

An overview of the changing revenue
landscape, the various bodies that govern, control and protect you as
a musician. A specific look at needle-time and the challenges
facing collection of revenue.

2:45pm
to 3:05pm
An open forum for your
questions relating specifically to revenue avenues you are currently
not seeing.

Nicholas
Motsatse,
CEO South African Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO).

Nicholas will be specifically asked
to respond to the ongoing copyright tribunal dispute between SAMPRA,
AIRCO, SARRAL and SAMRO currently underway where various bodies are
claiming to control the needle-time rights.
(Moderated by Peter Lacey)

3:05pm Break
3:15pm
to 4:05pm
Hey, I got my money,
who needs a contract

Nick
Matzukis,
Academy of Sound Engineering

Last year’s most popular topic returns
in two guises. We will look at both the recording side of the business
(record contracts, 360 degree deals, licensing and distribution deals)
and publishing contracts (sync licensing, songwriter contracts and Deeds
of assignment). How to get the most out of giving your music away.

4:05pm to 4:25pm Break
4:25pm
to 5pm
Subscribe yourself

Jake Larsen,
Head of Music Nokia Middle East and Africa

As the industry quite literally turns
itself on its head we hear from one of the companies at the forefront
of the new media world. What does music mean to Nokia and how
are they taking music to a world market? IS subscription the way of
the future

5:00pm
to 6:00pm
New licensing, marketing
and revenue opportunities from online and mobile social networks.

Dave Duarte,
Managing Director Huddlemind, Programme Director UCT Graduate School
of Business

This talk will look at the opportunities and challenges presented by
social-media as people share and discover music online through social
search channels like Facebook, YouTube and
MySpace as well as a plethora of blogs, tweets and recommendation engines.
Despite a deeply embedded online culture of not
paying for music, a host of new revenue opportunities abound.

DAY 2 –
TUESDAY 23 MARCH 2010

Schedule Detail
10am
to 11:00am
Keeping it Real –
South African Success Stories.

We let some of South Africa’s top
talent talk to us about their experiences in the industry. (Moderated
by Peter Lacey)

  • Sipho
    “Hotstix” Mabuse
  • Andrew
    Mac
    , Mac Stanley
  • Peter
    Pote
    , Evolver
  • Verity
  • Neo
    Muyanga
    , BLK Sunshine
  • Zaki Ibrahim
11am
to 11:20am
The Digital Year in Review

Gillian Ezra,
Sales Director Exactmobile

We look at the statistics for 2009 and
how they will affect your business going forward. Where are the success
stories, and who should you be steering clear of. An overview of the
digital landscape with a practical focus.

  • Formats eg full track v ringbacktones
  • Where to sell eg MTN Play,
    VC, Omniphone
  • Subscription services
  • Streaming
  • Digital royalties
11:20am Break
11:30pm
to 12:30pm
The physical side of
digital – creating a cost effective Web presence

Brian
Currin,
Web Marketing Consultant

How to create an effective web presence
without breaking the bank. Utilizing free tools and platforms to get
your message and music out there.

12:30pm
to 12:40pm
New business proposals,
New applications, New technologies, New models. What to do?

Yoel
Kenan,
CEO Africori, former Senior Vice President International
Marketing BMG, former CEO mp3.com

12:40pm
to 2pm
Lunch
2:00pm
to 3:15pm
What is more important,
a digital profile or a strong traditional media presence.

Bringing together the pros from radio,
TV, online and print we discuss the importance of media in the music
industry and who has what role to play for success.

(Moderated by Diane
Coetser)

  • Miles
    Keylock
    , Music Journalist
  • Jason Curtis, Music
    Journalist
  • Karl
    Gostner
    , General Manager, Primedia Broadcasting, Cape Town
  • Evan Milton, Music
    Journalist
3:15pm Break
3:15pm
to 4:15pm
Whose more important
– an accountant, a manager, a publicist or a booking agent?

Well that depends doesn’t it. We’ll
assemble a couple of each and let them slug it out in front of you.
(Moderated by Martin Myers)

  • John Langford, COO,
    Big Concerts
  • Sean
    Wienand
    , Managing Director, Headline Artists
  • Roach, African Dope
    Records
  • Doug Davenport, Manager
    Evolver One
  • Sipho
    “Hotstix” Mabuse
4:15pm Break
4:30pm
to 5:10pm
The synchronization business
– Hype or Reality!!

David Alexander, CEO, Sheer Publishing

A step-by-step guide to placing your
music in film, TV and games both locally and internationally.
Why your publisher remains an essential partner in the process.

5:10pm
to 5:30pm
Closing Address

  • Martin
    Myers
    – Moderator
  • Peter
    Lacey
    – Moderator

9pm Showcase Evening,
Mercury Live, Cape Town

DAY 3
– WEDNESDAY 24 MARCH 2010 (OPTIONAL)

Schedule Detail
10am
to 12:00am
Embracing
New Media Tools for maximum exposure
.

Brian
Currin,
Web Marketing Consultant

Tips and Techniques for setting up:

  • WordPress
    Blog
  • Twitter Profile
  • Facebook Fan Page
  • Soundcloud Profile

Delegates will leave the workshop
with the skills to start promoting themselves and their music online.

10am
to 12:00am
The different types of
income streams and royalties in the music business

Nick
Matzukis,
Music Industry Lawyer

  • How to understand and distinguish
    them
  • How to make sure you are
    extracting the maximum from them
  • We will cover all the different
    forms of direct revenue created by musicians, from recording royalties,
    to publishing income, synchronisation income to needle-time

Thank you from Yvonne Chaka Chaka

Dear Martin

Working with you and Sipho and the whole team was great. I am humbled and thankful.

once again thank you for your support.

Yvonne

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