Trevor Jones speaking personally about The 20th anniversary of Freedom & Democracy in South Africa

There are many special moments and memories that I have of 1994.

In particular the extraordinary experience of standing in a queue in Trafalgar Square outside South Africa House, with my mother, who was visiting me in London, she was waiting to vote in the first democratic elections of our country.

I had  my passport revoked and had been stateless for a number of years, studying in exile in Britain, and consequently could not vote.

On my return to South Africa after 29 years, my four children and I were invited to apply for re-instatement of South African citizenships by the immigration authorities.

I had vowed that I would never return to South Africa while apartheid existed and until such time as one man, one vote was instituted.  But frankly I dreamt but never believed that this would happen in my life-time.

In those years in exile I vigorously pursued my studies and forged a career in Film and Music.

There were always two cars outside my house in London which was under surveillance by the Security Police   —  while downstairs in my studio,  I was composing the music for short anti-apartheid commercials while my brother Colin Jones hosted Senior exiled members of the ANC.  He would update people like the Pahad brothers,  on  recent events in SA.

Oliver Tambo and Thabo Mbeki were my neighbours in Muswell Hill.

A couple of months after voting on the birthday of our eldest son my family and I watched the inauguration of Nelson Mandela – it was a joyous double celebration that day in our household.

Nearly a year later – on the 21st March (1995) – I watched with pride along with the rest of the world, live from Cape Town, my brother, Colin Jones, The Dean of the Cathedral hosting Madiba, The Arch, (Bishop Tutu), Martin Luther King’s widow, The Queen of England and Prince Philip, and other dignitaries,  commemorate the first human rights day   in South Africa.

 

This was the beginnings of our infant democracy, a twenty year young evolution and learning curve – which needs to be a constant process of change and development.

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Trevor Jones

The most important for me being Investment in our greatest resource  – the nurturing and education of our young – the next generation of the rainbow nation.

As we learn lessons about what a democracy should be and how to exercise our rights within the system, lets recall some of the words of Madiba:

.Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.

It is what we make out of what we have,     not what we are given, that separates one person   –  from another. 

He could also have said that you can lead a horse to the water but its up to us to drink – of the waters of freedom.

We look forward with hope and enthusiasm to the next twenty years as we learn from the successes and mistakes of the last twenty years.

Success is the 10% tip of the ice-berg      –        of which 90% is striving and failure.

GOD grant us the SERENITY to accept things we cannot change.

The COURAGE to change the things we can.

AND the wisdom to know the DIFFERENCE.

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About Martin Myers
Music Supervisor / Artist and Talent Manager / Publicist / Music Exchange Founder / Owner Triple M Entertainment

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