PUBLIC FORUM and arts program: Re-Thinking Heritage, the Arts and the Museum in South Africa

PUBLIC FORUM and arts program: Re-Thinking Heritage, the Arts and the Museum in South Africa

Thursday 26 September 2019

Location: The South African Sendigsgestig Museum, 40 Long Street Cape Town

Time: 18:00 – 20:00

In celebration of Heritage Month, Heritage day on 24th September and the South African tradition of critical public engagement, the South African Cultural Policy Network (SACPN) in collaboration with the South African Slave Church Museum and a selection of local artists invites you to an evening event and panel discussion on Re-Thinking Heritage, the Arts and the Museum in South Africa.

Our venue on the evening, a critically important one in both South African and global history, is a place deserving of respect and serious reflection. In honour of the painful stories and memories preserved there, it being national Heritage month and this year marking the 400th anniversary of the Atlantic Slave Trade, we have curated a short programme of select performances for before and after the evening’s discussion:

18:00 Greeting & Intro Performance

18:30 Public Forum

19:55 Closing Performance

PUBLIC FORUM

We frame this mediated public forum first in a national context: how do we think, practice, perform and live out our understanding of art, culture and heritage in South Africa? In the words of one of our panelists ‘what is the sociological role of the museum in building a socially cohesive society? How does it unshackle itself from its founding ethos as a colonial instrument?’ (Kasibe, 2017). How might the arts play a role in rethinking the museum and questions around heritage?

We also look at the global context, in which the longstanding debate around whether museums can be ideologically neutral, around the recognition of the museums’ violent and imperial origins and around the 21st Century museums’ social, political and cultural value is gaining increased momentum on various platforms. Should the museums’ core mission be the preservation of tangible and intangible heritage, or should it be the use of cultural heritage to promote human dignity, social justice, global equality, and planetary well-being? What does this mean in practice?

We have invited four panelists who are invested practically and intellectually in the field of museums, heritage, art and public culture to share their views with us, after which we invite debate and contribution from you. Please join our discussion with:

  • Wandile Kasibe is a PhD candidate in Sociology, UCT, a Chevening scholar and museologist with international training. His research focuses on ‘The Intersection between Museums and the Construction of Race Ideologies in South Africa’.
  • Siona O’Connell is an African Studies scholar, curator and film maker at the University of Pretoria.
  • Steven Sack works as an independent consultant in the area of arts, museums and cultural policy. He was most recently the CEO of the Origins Centre, University of the Witwatersrand.
  • Masa Soko is the museum manager of the Lwandle Migrant Labour Museum, qualified in museum and heritage studies and Heritage Ambassador for the District Six and Lwandle Museums.

Entrance is free but seating is limited. Please RSVP to sophiaroso to confirm attendance no later than Wednesday 25 September.

Celebrated singer/songwriter CANDICE PILLAY to fly in from LA for MEX19 (Music Exchange 2019)

MUSIC EXCHANGE (#MEX19), South Africa’s only entertainment-economy-focused conference, returns to Cape Town for the ninth time from 13 to 15 September 2019 at the impressive Radisson Red Hotel at the V &A Waterfront.

As part of what has become a highly anticipated Cape Town annual imbizo, MEX, well known and respected for delivering the very best and relevant players in the global music economy, has done it again in welcoming Candice Pillay at this year’s gathering.

Candice will be speaking on Sunday 15th at 11am

Born and raised in Pietermaritzburg, Pillay has come a long way from her humble KZN roots.

Working with iconic names in the music industry, Pillay has added her genius to tracks made famous by the likes of Dr. Dre, Eminem, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dog, Rihanna, Christina Aguilera, Schoolboy Q, Timberland, Anderson. Paak, Tinie Tempah and Calvin Harris.

Today she is well installed and celebrated in Los Angeles, California, as a revered singer and seminal songwriter.

As one of MEX19’s Sunday keynote speakers, Pillay will deliver an address that investors in the South African and bigger global music economy will truly benefit from being in attendance.
Better news still for followers and fans of Pillay’s lyrical and vocal prowess is that she’s set to release her next album, along with tour dates in 2020, all while continuing to co-produce, write, and redefine artist development with many up and coming artists around the world.

“Securing the calibre of Candice Pillay is a coupe for MEX19, and the greater South African music community,” MEX19 convener, Martin Myers celebrates. “We are truly excited and humbled to have her share her journey and impart invaluable, real-life learnings with all MEX19 attendees.”

Candice Pillay’s discography includes:

Dr. Dre
“Genocide” (ft. Dr Dre, Candice Pillay, Kendrick Lamar & Marsha Ambrosius)
“One Shot One Kill” (ft. Snoo Dogg, John Connor)
“Medicine Man” (ft. Dr Dre, Eminem, Candice Pillay & Anderson Paak)
“Intro” (Vocals)
School Boy Q
“Groovy Tony”
“Eddie Cane”
“Ride Out”
“Whatever You Want” (School Boy Q ft. Candice Pillay)
“By Any Means”
“Big Body”

Rihanna
“Cockiness (Love It)”
“American Oxygen”

Christina Aguilera
“Lotus”
“Make The World Move”
“Cease Fire”
“Circles”
“Best of Me”
“Shut Up”
“ Light Up the Sky”

Tinie Tempa
“Don’t Sell Out” (ft. Candice Pillay)
“Witch Doctor” (ft. Candice Pillay)
FarEast Movement
“F-VR” (ft. Candice Pillay)
Sevyn Streeter
“Consistent”
Dumblonde
“You Got Me”
“Eyes On Horizon”
“Remember Me”
“Tender Green Life”
“Love Blind”
“Yellow Canary”
“White Lightning”
“Waiting On You”
“Take Away”
“Carry On”

Disney’s The Lion King is the highest grossing film of all time in South Africa

In its seventh week of release (30 August – September 2019), Disney’s The Lion King became the all-time top-grossing film in South Africa, with a haul of over R107.6 million since it’s 19 July 2019 release across the continent.

The all-new film from Disney crossed 2018’s Marvel Studios’ Black Panther to claim the record, with both films followed closely by two other Marvel Studios films, namely Avengers: Endgame and Infinity War respectively. This means that Walt Disney Studios releases account for 4 of the top 5 films of all time at the South African box office.

“We continue to celebrate this incredible film with fans across the continent and are thrilled that audiences at home have embraced the iconic storytelling, characters and breath-taking music that can only be delivered by The Lion King.” says Christine Service, Senior Vice President of The Walt Disney Company Africa.

Directed by Jon Favreau, and utilizing pioneering filmmaking techniques to bring treasured characters to life in a whole new way, Disney’s The Lion King boasts an all-star cast that includes Donald Glover as Simba, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter as Nala, James Earl Jones as Mufasa, Chiwetel Ejiofor as Scar, Seth Rogen as Pumbaa, Billy Eichner as Timon and South Africa’s own Dr. John Kani as Rafiki. Local music legend Lebo M features on the breath-taking soundtrack as does Pharrell Williams, Elton John, Tim Rice and the cast.

In addition, over 10 000 high school learners from under-served communities saw the film this past August as The Walt Disney Company Africa, in collaboration with Hyundai Santa Fe, FNB and Attacq Foundation ran The Lion King Screening Programme at Ster-Kinekor Theatres. The sessions included an educational conservation talk by The Endangered Wildlife Trust, with snack packs donated by Makro.

Disney’s The Lion King is currently in cinemas.

Stage and recording artist icon, David Kramer confirmed and he will deliver the keynote address at MEX19

MUSIC EXCHANGE (#MEX19), South Africa’s only entertainment-economy-focused conference, returns to Cape Town for the ninth time from 13 to 15 September 2019 at the impressive Radisson Red Hotel at the V &A Waterfront.
Stage and recording artist icon, David Kramer has confirmed he will deliver the keynote address at MEX19.

Famous for his Broadway and West End exports, Kat & The Kings, District 6 and the upcoming Danger In the Dark production debuting at The Baxter in Cape Town from 11 October, MEX19 is set to be a weekend of note.

Music Exchange was also honoured and recognised by the Western Cape Government for its contribution to Arts and Culture in March; and this year’s conference will have an overarching theme of “rights “.
Starting on Friday 13 September, at 2pm, MEX19 will officially open with the Composers, Authors and Publishers Association (Capasso), before moving onto the South African Performance Rights Association (SAMPRA), as well as the South African Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO) – all three major collecting agencies in the country – who will share the podium at the country’s only annual conference that seeks to empower South Africa’s entertainment economy.

Over the following two days, attending delegates can look forward to more than 19 talks and panels over the three day emersion. All with the aim of empowering each with practical knowledge to apply to their careers.

Other highlights include:

· MEX19 keynote speaker, David Kramer

· CEO of Just Music, Charles Kuhn, and Head of A&R Matthew Fink

· Lance Stehr , Head of Muthland Records

· Steve Werner, Station Manager at KFM

· Sotiris Moldovanos at music streaming service, Deezer

· Music reality show panel , hosted by RJ Benjamin, along with:
Paxton Fielies – Idols 2017 Winner
Lize Mynhardt – Idols 2014 Second runner up
Robin Pieters – TVSA 2016 Round 5 contender
Sasha-Lee – Idols 2009 Joint winner
PJ Twins – TVSA 2019 Top 5 finalist, SA Got Talent runner up
Amy Tsjasink – TVSA 2019 Semi-finalist
Elwira Standili – Idols 2015 Top 8 Finalist
David Januari – X-Factor SA 2014 winning group ‘Four’

With MUSIC EXCHANGE now well-and-truly established and respected – thanks to the incredible support from some of the world’s biggest names in production, song writing, composition, management, PR, digital strategy and live performance – MEX19 is excited to announce more of the same in the build up to its biggest weekend yet.

City of Cape Town’s Zahid Badroodien, Mayoral Committee Member for Community Services and Health, says, “As a host city and a proud sponsor of the Music Exchange conference, the City is really looking forward to welcoming the delegates and the participants to the world’s leading festival and event destination. Cape Town has a diverse musical offering and it’s the perfect place to host an event which celebrates musical diversity.

This event will also provide an a platform to young up and coming artists through coaching clinics, as well as developmental workshops ,and the City is always proud to support initiatives that provide opportunities to our residents.”

Martin Myers, founder and convenor of the conference, remarked, “This year MEX is delighted to have the key decision makers of some of the most important music bodies in South Africa attending”.
Artists include Chad Saaiman and MEX chairperson, the legend Sipho Mabuse. Booking agents and promoters Nikki Froneman, Jarrod Aston , Lesley Wells, Craig Parks and Lauren Parks will also be sharing their knowledge, along with community radio specialist Selwyn Bartlett. MEX19 will also welcome back longstanding partners Paul Bothner Music to the fold.

Digital monetisation and understanding your rights, be it legal (including what a proper legal contract looks like and how to navigate the small claims court), or rights in the digital economy, all also will be unpacked, demystified and opportunities explored at MEX19.

With more speakers and events to be announced over the coming week, in the build-up to MEX19, follow us on Facebook to get breaking announcements, as they happen.

Whether you’re an established or ambitious young artist, publicist, producer, DJ, manager, venue owner, record label, agency or corporate brand looking to gain invaluable insight and learning’s every delegate can actively apply and benefit from, MEX19 is the creative hub responsible for bringing it all together.

Limited delegates tickets for MEX19 are available now through Quicket.

Full conference tickets, for all days, cost R500 including lunch on Saturday and Sunday

Lyrics Still Matter show to be held on 11 &12 September at the Cape Town Comedy Club

Fresh from a sold-out run at the Artscape Theatre, the cast of Lyrics Still Matter is back – this time, bringing their production to the Cape Town Comedy Club at the V&A Waterfront.

Two vocal artists share how music and lyrics have shaped their experiences of growing up in the diverse city of Cape Town, as well as how their art was influenced by the culture around them.

Ghoema award-winning Hip Hop soul singer & rapper Jerome Rex and singer-songwriter Nadine Matthews will have you enthralled as they musically share their journeys. The show will be woven together by a range of familiar songs, as well as the pair’s own original material. This will include a combination of RnB, dance, smooth jazz and Afrikaans hip hop.

Themes of identity and community pride are explored through the lyrics of songs with the backing of a 4-piece band; Nathaneal Barthus, Bradley Lodewyk, Robin Thompson, Vaughn Webber and backing vocalists Adelle Kock & Timothy Stuurman. Look out for guest appearances by acclaimed flamenco dancer Demi Johnson and saxophonist Lee Hoffmann, all hosted by our MC, Garden Route native and award-winning rapper Jason “Hakkiesdraad” Hartman.

Lyrics Still Matter shows at the Cape Town Comedy Club on 11 and 12 September. Tickets are available at Computicket: https://mobile.computicket.com/event/lyrics_still_matter/7081216

[tags,Lyrics Still Matter ,Jerome Rex, Cape Town Comedy Club]

Worth getting this book from Wordsworth Stores or Bay Books Hout Bay

Worth getting this book by Barry Varkel

Very funny and this review by Raymond Alexander below is an honest reflection of the book Goy Vey -A Gentile’s Guide to Judaism

Do try and get the book and have a good old laugh at people in South Africa

HAS THE SPRINGBOK – ALL BLACK RIVALRY BEEN IGNITED?

THE clamour for tickets ahead of yesterdays sold-out Rugby Championship match between the All Blacks and the Springboks in Wellington has raised the question as to whether the age old rivalry between the teams has been ignited. (match was a draw 16 all )

Unquestionably it has thanks to the recent resurgence of the Springboks under Rassie Erasmus, but the rivalry born in 1921, when the two countries first met in Dunedin, is mostly rooted in the 75 years of the pre-1996 amateur era, and since then it has been seriously tested in a modern era that has seen New Zealand dominate world rugby.
But since 2016 that outright Kiwi dominance has waned a wee bit, as they would say in New Zealand parlance, as evidenced by their loss and a draw to the British and Irish Lions, two losses to Ireland, and one defeat apiece to Australia and South Africa.

And it is the closeness of the last three Test matches between the Boks and the All Blacks (going into this morning’s game) that have had South African hearts aflutter and New Zealanders welcoming back a genuine challenge to their dominance.

Last year, the teams perfectly cancelled each other out with a home and away aggregate score of 66-66 following the 34-32 Bok win in Wellington and the 32-20 All Blacks victory in Pretoria; while the previous encounter between the sides had seen the visiting Kiwis squeak home 25-24 in Cape Town.

In other words, there was one point separating the teams over their last three encounters before today’s match.

And the closeness of those three matches has been celebrated by rugby purists in both countries who have treasured the rivalry between the countries, but had wept at the alarming discrepancy between the sides in their previous three encounters that had seen the All Blacks ruthlessly win 41-13, 57-15 and 57-0.

But let’s digress from the Boks’ erratic (to put it euphemistically) performances against New Zealand in the professional era and examine just why these two countries have this exclusive and mutually sentimental need to beat each other more than the other nations.

Over three quarters of a century of amateur rugby, during which the two countries out rightly dominated world rugby, the Springboks had a superior record to the All Blacks.
In short, up until the first post-isolation Test between South Africa and New Zealand in 1992, the Springboks had won 20 Tests against the All Blacks, the latter had won 15, and two matches had been drawn.

The Boks had won a series in New Zealand (1937) but the All Blacks had never won a series on South African soil. As the rivalry progressed into the post World War Two era, the Boks defeated the All Blacks eight times in a row, and nine times out of 10, including the famous “All Blacked out” series of 1949 in South Africa in which the Kiwis had no answer in three Tests.
These days, can you imagine the Springboks winning nine out of 10 consecutive Tests against the All Blacks …?

Progressing into the post World War Two era, the Kiwis won a home series 2-1 in 1956; the Boks reciprocated with a 2-1 win at home in 1960; the All Blacks then won 3-1 in New Zealand in 1965 only to be overturned 3-1 in South Africa in 1970.

South Africa again won 3-1 in South Africa in 1976 only to lose 2-1 in New Zealand in 1981 in an incredibly dramatic tour that divided the country on the issue of “sports versus politics”. Whatever your stance, that tour strikingly entrenched the colourful relationship between the two rugby-mad countries.

In 1986, an unofficial All Blacks Cavaliers side (missing two conscientious objectors in John Kirwan and David Kirk), lost a series in South Africa that again had New Zealanders on the one hand demonising apartheid but with another hand tuning the TV remote into the rugby.

The rivalry thankfully enjoyed a bright new dawn in the post-apartheid Test of 1992 in which the Kiwis squeaked home at a reverberating Ellis Park, with the late James Small spilling a pass at the end of the game which should have seen him win the match for the Boks.

The Boks, and Small, then got it wonderfully right in the World Cup final at the same venue in 1995 after having lost a series in New Zealand in 1994.

And that brings us to quite possibly the most emotional celebrations the All Blacks have ever enjoyed, certainly in what I have seen in 25 year of covering international rugby. The scene was Loftus Versfeld in 1996 and the New Zealanders had snuck home against the Boks to take an unassailable 2-0 lead in a series they would win 2-1.

In the press box that day, I saw usually stony-faced Kiwi scribes weep with emotion, as did Sean Fitzpatrick and his men. The Loftus pitch was littered with All Blacks lying prone on their backs, staring to the heavens with delight.

That is what it meant to New Zealand to at last win a series in South Africa.

And, sadly for South Africa, that home series defeat marked a watershed in the great rivalry. From then on it has been mostly one-sided, with the New Zealand landslide held up only by the occasional Springbok obstacle.

In the 50 matches since the start of the professional era, New Zealand have won 36 Tests to South Africa’s 14, although in that time the Boks have won two World Cups to the two of the New Zealanders (they have a third from the 1989 amateur era).

Overall the New Zealanders have won 79 percent of the Tests they have played and the Springbok 65 percent. No other country has come close.

The problem for the age old rivalry is that in the professional era, the Boks have at best posted threats of a revival, with the occasional bang inevitably followed by a despairing whimper.

And the reason for this has been the abjectly poor administration by the South African Rugby Union. There has been a miserable failure to ensure there is continuity in the coaching structures of the Springboks, and consequently the players, which has meant that after every four (post World Cup) years a new coach has come in and started from scratch.

This contrasts starkly with a New Zealand model that has seen continuity in management of the team just about forever. Just one example of this is the fact that current All Blacks coach Steve Hansen began his apprenticeship for the top job under Graham Henry in 2004, taking over as head coach in 2012, and when he bows out after the World Cup later this year, his probable successor, Ian Foster, will have been an assistant for the last eight years.

This relentless continuity breeds seamless and sustained success, and it is why the All Blacks have been dominating a Springbok set-up that has a wholesale clearout after every World Cup, with the incoming coach largely starting from scratch.

Consider the following. After the 1999 World Cup which saw the Boks beat the All Blacks in a bronze medal play-off and then again in 2000 at Ellis Park before Nick Mallett was fired, the Boks then lost eight in a row to the All Blacks as first Harry Viljoen and then Rudolf Straeuli failed to rebuild the Boks in the post-Mallett era that had seen the Boks equal the world record for successive Test victories.

Straeuli had in fact blooded the core of players that under Jake White would record back-to-back victories over the All Blacks across 2004 and 2005, and then win again in 2006 in Rustenberg.
That same Bok team would win three in a row against the All Blacks in 2009. That was under coach Pieter de Villiers, but when Heyneke Meyer took over with a whole new squad and staff, the Boks lost six in a row to the All Blacks before a win in 2014.

Meyer ultimately presided over a Bok team that lost just 20-18 to the All Blacks in the semi-finals of the 2015 World Cup, and then there was a colossal clear-out of players and coaching staff that meant incoming Allister Coetzee was fatally impaired, and those three 50-something reverses to the All Blacks in 2016 and 2017 were the result.

The Boks under Erasmus are now enjoying a resurgence against the Old Foe but the bottom line as far as challenging the All Blacks for a meaningful period of time is that Saru has to wake up and ensure that the Boks have long-term continuity instead of fatally having to reinvent themselves after each World Cup.

Mike Greenaway has the privilege of covering most of the Springboks’ victories over the All Blacks in the professional era. Here are his three favourites.

1998 New Zealand 3 South Africa 13 (Wellington)

This was the last ever Test match at the famous Athletic Park, a rickety old ground that was to make way for the Cake Tin that was nearing completion at the time of this match. The All Blacks wanted to bid a fitting farewell to a historic stadium but Gary Teichmann’s Boks were the party poopers. The unforgettable moment in that match was the match-winning try that saw flyhalf Henry Honiball deliver a brilliant inside pass to incoming blindside wing Pieter Rossouw.

2009 New Zealand 29 South Africa 32 (Hamilton)

The score-line flattered an All Blacks side that scored a late flurry of points after the visitors had smashed them for most of the game. The Boks had already beaten the Kiwis twice in South Africa and this victory secured them the Tri-Nations title. This match was memorable, too, for the three crowd-silencing penalties struck by fullback Francois Steyn from well within his half that locally earned him the nick name of “Jet boots”.

2006 South Africa 21 New Zealand 20 (Rustenburg) -His great mate Martin Myers was at that game

This was one the filthiest Tests between these countries of the modern era. The Boks under Jake White and John Smit were dangling by a thread after five successive losses. One more and there would have been a clear-out ahead of the 2007 Word Cup. But the “gatvol” Boks threw all caution to the wind and scrapped out a win that was secured by a last-minute penalty goal by Andre PretoriusA year later that same Bok team won the World Cup!

By Mike Greenaway

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