The Boss -29 January 2013 -this was the show 3rd night in Cape Town

It was beyond anything I could have imagined, in every aspect, and much much more. The band, the songs, the showmanship, the lyrics, quality, the arrangement, fuckinhell, The Boss!

I think we know where he gets the title from.

We had Mos Def on stage ,We had a wedding proposal on stage and 3 hours of bliss ending with
an acoustic version of Thunder Road -Solo by the Boss

Bruce Springsteen’s 18th studio album is a portrait of the artist at the top of his 21st-century game

Bruce Springsteen’s 18th studio album is a portrait of the artist at the top of his 21st-century game: rock-soul dynamite and finely drawn pathos bound by familiar, urgent themes (national crisis, private struggle, the daily striving for more perfect union) and the certain-victor’s force in Springsteen’s singing.

High Hopes is also a deep look back over Springsteen’s past decade, his best onstage and record since the first, with a keen eye turned forward. The cumulative effect of this mass of old, borrowed, blue and renewed – covers, recent outtakes and redefining takes on two classics – is retrospect with a cutting edge, running like one of the singer’s epic look-ma-no-set-list gigs: full of surprises, all with a reason for being there.

Much of High Hopes comes from the what-was-he-thinking shelf: unreleased songs cut for albums going back to 2002’s The Rising, revived with freshening parts. It’s hard to see how “Frankie Fell in Love,” a frat-rock riot, and the letter from rock bottom “Down in the Hole” (“My Hometown” with less light) ever got the chop. But Springsteen effectively recasts this material with the folk-soul-gospel-army might of his current E Street big band.

The background-vocal choir puts a literal finishing touch on the warrior-hymn charge of “Heaven’s Wall.” In the gangsters convention “Harry’s Place,” recent E Street recruit Tom Morello fires chain-saw bursts of guitar across meaty peals of sax originally laid down by the late Clarence Clemons. And that’s Danny Federici, who died in 2008, playing organ on “The Wall,” a requiem for one of Springsteen’s Jersey-bar-band mentors, underscoring the singer’s belief in the unbroken chains running through his band.

Springsteen revisits two older songs with dramatic results: the acoustic title track from 1995’s The Ghost of Tom Joad, and “American Skin (41 Shots),” his response to the 1999 killing of Amadou Diallo by New York City police. Morello previously electrified “Tom Joad” with Rage Against the Machine; he is a key trigger in this heaving-Phil Spector detonation as well. Springsteen gives him a verse to sing, adding a younger, strident tension to his own fury, while Morello’s soloing – scouring and elegiac – puts a new exclamation point on the pledge of righteous vengeance, the way Jimi Hendrix forever altered the Armageddon in “All Along the Watchtower.” Morello is on “American Skin” too, but this version is Springsteen’s triumph as a bandleader – sculpting that live force with rich studio textures – and a topical lyricist, mining new headlines (Trayvon Martin, NSA surveillance, the numbing cycle of school shootings) reverberating in there now.

High Hopes starts and ends with covers, a first on a Springsteen studio album. But the title song, a 1990 rebel-folk gallop by the Havalinas, and Suicide’s closing mantra, “Dream Baby Dream,” are fighters’ promises, and they fit Springsteen and this record like weathered boxing gloves. “Give me help/Give me strength/Give a soul a night of fearless sleep,” he demands in the former, in a crusty, arcing howl, like a guy who’s been doing this for a long time and is real tired of asking nice.

www.rollingstone.com

Bruce Springsteen Statement About “The Promise: The Making of Darkness On The Edge Of Town” documentary

Please see below a statement that was issued yesterday by the Toronto Film Festival — more details to follow shortly:

Bruce Springsteen, Jon Landau Management, and Columbia Records are working on completing a new package related to ‘Darkness on the Edge of Town,’ which will include the new Thom Zimny film “The Promise: The Making of Darkness On The Edge Of Town.” Further details will be announced when they are finalized.

“The Promise: The Making of Darkness On The Edge Of Town” will premier September 14 at the Toronto International Film Festival.

The Promise: The Making of Darkness on the Edge of Town takes us into the studio with Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band for the recording of their fourth album. Grammy and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Thom Zimny has collaborated with Springsteen on this documentary, gaining access to never before seen footage shot between 1976-1978, capturing home rehearsals and recording sessions that allow us to see Springsteen’s creative process at work.

Bruce Springsteen – London Calling Live in Hyde Park DVD

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND

LONDON CALLING: LIVE IN HYDE PARK

DVD & Blu-ray

COLUMBIA RECORDS TO RELEASE BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND’S ‘LONDON

CALLING: LIVE IN HYDE PARK’ CONCERT FILM ON JUNE 28

RELEASE MARKS FIRST SPRINGSTEEN OUTDOOR CONCERT FILM AND FIRST FROM A FESTIVAL SETTING

On June 28, Columbia Records will release Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band’s ‘London Calling: Live In Hyde Park’ concert film on one Blu-Ray disc and as a two DVD set. Captured in London at the Hard Rock Calling Festival on June 28, 2009 in HD, the 163-minute film documents 26 tracks of live Springsteen that begin in daylight and progress through a gorgeous sunset into night.

‘London Calling: Live In Hyde Park’ conveys both the experience of being on-stage and the vast crowd experience of the festival environment. Viewers are able to see Springsteen spontaneously directing the E Street Band and shaping the show as it evolves.

The set list spans from ‘Born To Run’ era to ‘Working On a Dream’ and includes rare covers such as The Clash’s “London Calling,” Jimmy Cliff’s “Trapped,” The Young Rascals’ “Good Lovin’,” and Eddie Floyd’s “Raise Your Hand.” Springsteen also performs fan favorite “Hard Times (Come Again No More),” written by Stephen Foster in 1854. Brian Fallon from The Gaslight Anthem joins the band as a guest vocalist on Springsteen’s own “No Surrender.”

The concert earned rave reviews. The London Times called it “epic” and “a revved-up three-hour power drive through Springsteen¹s America.” The Independent concurred, “He awed the 50,000-strong crowds drenched in sweat by the second number, tossing his guitars to the roadies with the vigour of a frontman a third of his age and jogging down a walkway to meet his fans and take their requests, Springsteen’s intensity was staggering from first powerful vocal to final thrashed-out chord.”

GRAMMY and Emmy Award-winning producer and editor Thom Zimny and director Chris Hilson, both members of Springsteen’s video team dating back over a decade, oversaw the film. Audio was mixed by Bob Clearmountain.

Bonus material includes stunning footage of “The River” from Glastonbury, June 27; and the full music video for “Wrecking Ball,” filmed at New Jersey’s Giants Stadium.

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND

LONDON CALLING: LIVE IN HYDE PARK

1. London Calling

2. Badlands

3. Night

4. She’s The One

5. Outlaw Pete

6. Out In The Street

7. Working On A Dream

8. Seeds

9. Johnny 99

10. Youngstown

11. Good Lovin’

12. Bobby Jean

13. Trapped

14. No Surrender

15. Waiting On A Sunny Day

16. Promised Land

17. Racing In The Street

18. Radio Nowhere

19. Lonesome Day

20. The Rising

21. Born To Run

22. Hard Times (Come Again No More)

23. Jungleland

24. American Land

25. Glory Days

26. Dancing In The Dark

27. Music under end credit sequence: Raise Your Hand

BONUS MATERIAL:

The River: Glastonbury Festival, 2009

Wrecking Ball: Giants Stadium, 2009

http://brucespringsteen.net

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