Springbok Trophy Tour – Cape Town Route for Monday 11 November

Springbok Trophy Tour – Cape Town Route for Monday

The fifth and final leg of the Springboks’ RWC Trophy Tour will take place in Cape Town on Monday 11 Nov 2019

The route plan for Cape Town is as follows (all time approximate):

  • 10h30: Tour starts at City Hall and bus departs along Darling Street
  • Left onto Adderley Street
  • Right onto Wale Street
  • Left onto Long Street
  • Right onto Buitensingel
  • Right onto Loop Street
  • Right onto Strand Street
  • Left onto Adderley Street
  • Right onto Hertzog Boulevard onto Nelson Mandela Boulevard
  • 13h00: Second leg via N2 to Langa, Belhar and Elsies River
  • 13h30: Take Bhunga Avenue offramp
  • Right onto Washington Drive towards Jakes Gerwel and right towards N2
  • 14h30: Depart for Belhar via N2 and R300 onto Stellenbosch Arterial
  • Right onto Symphony Way into Robert Sobukwe
  • 15h15: Left onto De la Rey Street through Ravensmead
  • Left onto Francie van Zijl Drive towards Uitsig and Elsies River
  • Left onto Jakes Gerwel onto the N2 and back to the hotel (arrival approximately 17h00)

Please note: The actual bus trip is for filming purposes only and that no media will be allowed on the bus, however, you are free to position yourself along the route for footage.

Viva the Boks winning Rugby Word Cup 2019

IN eight previous World Cup finals there had been nothing remotely like it … I’m talking about the jaw-dropping, eyebrow-raising magnificence of the Springbok pack that blew Eddie Jones’ cocky England to smithereens, sweeping the South Africans to a 20-point winning margin, the second biggest ever in a final.

Just a week before, the world had marvelled at how England had dismantled New Zealand with a power game that their cock-a-hoop media described as the most complete England performance ever.

Very few folk outside of South Africa gave the Boks a chance, and almost none at all would have predicted such an emphatic conquest. Never had a team lost a Pool game and gone on to win the Cup…

But rugby remains an incredibly simple game. The essence of it has not changed in 150 years, and that is if you control possession by dominating the opposition in the set scrums, the line-outs, the restarts, plus you boss the breakdown battle, you control the game’s destiny.

When the two packs of forwards went down for the very first scrum, just 90 seconds into the game, and the green phalanx inched relentlessly forward, there was a collective roar across South Africa, and how Eddie’s heart must have sunk.

This was not going to be the forward arm wrestle of previous finals… And it got worse for the England pack, with Jerome Garces repeatedly blowing them for scrum infringements when they could not deal with the destructive force powering at them, and Handre Pollard duly nailed the penalty goals.

But if the pack is to quite rightly praised to the rafters, and the finishing of Makazole Mapimpi and Cheslin Kolbe celebrated long and lustily, there was another area of the Springbok game that trumped all else in securing their magnificent win.

And that was a seven-minute period not long after half time when England laid siege to the Bok line, sensing they could take the game by the throat. Wave after Red Rose wave foundered on the Springbok rock. Almost every England player flung himself at the line and every single one was repulsed. A few, in fact, managed to get over the line but before the ball could be grounded they were ferociously repelled.

Owen Farrell eventually settled for three points and the fact that it was not seven for all of that effort was a vital psychological victory for the Boks. The England heads went down, the South African chests puffed out, and for me that was the winning of the game.

The Boks to a man were exceptional but it would be churlish not to give praise where it is due in the case of fullback Willie le Roux. Seldom has a Springbok player been so vilified and understandably so given his wavering form in the tournament, but when it counted Le Roux came to the party. He was outstanding under the high ball and when he came in at first receiver he directed traffic commandingly.

Rassie Erasmus kept faith with the veteran and he came good when it mattered.

Faf de Klerk has also been the butt of social media jokes but he had the last laugh yesterday with a performance that brought to mind Jones’ description of the scrumhalf last year: “a painful little buzz saw.”

By Mike Greenaway

HAS THE SPRINGBOK – ALL BLACK RIVALRY BEEN IGNITED?

THE clamour for tickets ahead of yesterdays sold-out Rugby Championship match between the All Blacks and the Springboks in Wellington has raised the question as to whether the age old rivalry between the teams has been ignited. (match was a draw 16 all )

Unquestionably it has thanks to the recent resurgence of the Springboks under Rassie Erasmus, but the rivalry born in 1921, when the two countries first met in Dunedin, is mostly rooted in the 75 years of the pre-1996 amateur era, and since then it has been seriously tested in a modern era that has seen New Zealand dominate world rugby.
But since 2016 that outright Kiwi dominance has waned a wee bit, as they would say in New Zealand parlance, as evidenced by their loss and a draw to the British and Irish Lions, two losses to Ireland, and one defeat apiece to Australia and South Africa.

And it is the closeness of the last three Test matches between the Boks and the All Blacks (going into this morning’s game) that have had South African hearts aflutter and New Zealanders welcoming back a genuine challenge to their dominance.

Last year, the teams perfectly cancelled each other out with a home and away aggregate score of 66-66 following the 34-32 Bok win in Wellington and the 32-20 All Blacks victory in Pretoria; while the previous encounter between the sides had seen the visiting Kiwis squeak home 25-24 in Cape Town.

In other words, there was one point separating the teams over their last three encounters before today’s match.

And the closeness of those three matches has been celebrated by rugby purists in both countries who have treasured the rivalry between the countries, but had wept at the alarming discrepancy between the sides in their previous three encounters that had seen the All Blacks ruthlessly win 41-13, 57-15 and 57-0.

But let’s digress from the Boks’ erratic (to put it euphemistically) performances against New Zealand in the professional era and examine just why these two countries have this exclusive and mutually sentimental need to beat each other more than the other nations.

Over three quarters of a century of amateur rugby, during which the two countries out rightly dominated world rugby, the Springboks had a superior record to the All Blacks.
In short, up until the first post-isolation Test between South Africa and New Zealand in 1992, the Springboks had won 20 Tests against the All Blacks, the latter had won 15, and two matches had been drawn.

The Boks had won a series in New Zealand (1937) but the All Blacks had never won a series on South African soil. As the rivalry progressed into the post World War Two era, the Boks defeated the All Blacks eight times in a row, and nine times out of 10, including the famous “All Blacked out” series of 1949 in South Africa in which the Kiwis had no answer in three Tests.
These days, can you imagine the Springboks winning nine out of 10 consecutive Tests against the All Blacks …?

Progressing into the post World War Two era, the Kiwis won a home series 2-1 in 1956; the Boks reciprocated with a 2-1 win at home in 1960; the All Blacks then won 3-1 in New Zealand in 1965 only to be overturned 3-1 in South Africa in 1970.

South Africa again won 3-1 in South Africa in 1976 only to lose 2-1 in New Zealand in 1981 in an incredibly dramatic tour that divided the country on the issue of “sports versus politics”. Whatever your stance, that tour strikingly entrenched the colourful relationship between the two rugby-mad countries.

In 1986, an unofficial All Blacks Cavaliers side (missing two conscientious objectors in John Kirwan and David Kirk), lost a series in South Africa that again had New Zealanders on the one hand demonising apartheid but with another hand tuning the TV remote into the rugby.

The rivalry thankfully enjoyed a bright new dawn in the post-apartheid Test of 1992 in which the Kiwis squeaked home at a reverberating Ellis Park, with the late James Small spilling a pass at the end of the game which should have seen him win the match for the Boks.

The Boks, and Small, then got it wonderfully right in the World Cup final at the same venue in 1995 after having lost a series in New Zealand in 1994.

And that brings us to quite possibly the most emotional celebrations the All Blacks have ever enjoyed, certainly in what I have seen in 25 year of covering international rugby. The scene was Loftus Versfeld in 1996 and the New Zealanders had snuck home against the Boks to take an unassailable 2-0 lead in a series they would win 2-1.

In the press box that day, I saw usually stony-faced Kiwi scribes weep with emotion, as did Sean Fitzpatrick and his men. The Loftus pitch was littered with All Blacks lying prone on their backs, staring to the heavens with delight.

That is what it meant to New Zealand to at last win a series in South Africa.

And, sadly for South Africa, that home series defeat marked a watershed in the great rivalry. From then on it has been mostly one-sided, with the New Zealand landslide held up only by the occasional Springbok obstacle.

In the 50 matches since the start of the professional era, New Zealand have won 36 Tests to South Africa’s 14, although in that time the Boks have won two World Cups to the two of the New Zealanders (they have a third from the 1989 amateur era).

Overall the New Zealanders have won 79 percent of the Tests they have played and the Springbok 65 percent. No other country has come close.

The problem for the age old rivalry is that in the professional era, the Boks have at best posted threats of a revival, with the occasional bang inevitably followed by a despairing whimper.

And the reason for this has been the abjectly poor administration by the South African Rugby Union. There has been a miserable failure to ensure there is continuity in the coaching structures of the Springboks, and consequently the players, which has meant that after every four (post World Cup) years a new coach has come in and started from scratch.

This contrasts starkly with a New Zealand model that has seen continuity in management of the team just about forever. Just one example of this is the fact that current All Blacks coach Steve Hansen began his apprenticeship for the top job under Graham Henry in 2004, taking over as head coach in 2012, and when he bows out after the World Cup later this year, his probable successor, Ian Foster, will have been an assistant for the last eight years.

This relentless continuity breeds seamless and sustained success, and it is why the All Blacks have been dominating a Springbok set-up that has a wholesale clearout after every World Cup, with the incoming coach largely starting from scratch.

Consider the following. After the 1999 World Cup which saw the Boks beat the All Blacks in a bronze medal play-off and then again in 2000 at Ellis Park before Nick Mallett was fired, the Boks then lost eight in a row to the All Blacks as first Harry Viljoen and then Rudolf Straeuli failed to rebuild the Boks in the post-Mallett era that had seen the Boks equal the world record for successive Test victories.

Straeuli had in fact blooded the core of players that under Jake White would record back-to-back victories over the All Blacks across 2004 and 2005, and then win again in 2006 in Rustenberg.
That same Bok team would win three in a row against the All Blacks in 2009. That was under coach Pieter de Villiers, but when Heyneke Meyer took over with a whole new squad and staff, the Boks lost six in a row to the All Blacks before a win in 2014.

Meyer ultimately presided over a Bok team that lost just 20-18 to the All Blacks in the semi-finals of the 2015 World Cup, and then there was a colossal clear-out of players and coaching staff that meant incoming Allister Coetzee was fatally impaired, and those three 50-something reverses to the All Blacks in 2016 and 2017 were the result.

The Boks under Erasmus are now enjoying a resurgence against the Old Foe but the bottom line as far as challenging the All Blacks for a meaningful period of time is that Saru has to wake up and ensure that the Boks have long-term continuity instead of fatally having to reinvent themselves after each World Cup.

Mike Greenaway has the privilege of covering most of the Springboks’ victories over the All Blacks in the professional era. Here are his three favourites.

1998 New Zealand 3 South Africa 13 (Wellington)

This was the last ever Test match at the famous Athletic Park, a rickety old ground that was to make way for the Cake Tin that was nearing completion at the time of this match. The All Blacks wanted to bid a fitting farewell to a historic stadium but Gary Teichmann’s Boks were the party poopers. The unforgettable moment in that match was the match-winning try that saw flyhalf Henry Honiball deliver a brilliant inside pass to incoming blindside wing Pieter Rossouw.

2009 New Zealand 29 South Africa 32 (Hamilton)

The score-line flattered an All Blacks side that scored a late flurry of points after the visitors had smashed them for most of the game. The Boks had already beaten the Kiwis twice in South Africa and this victory secured them the Tri-Nations title. This match was memorable, too, for the three crowd-silencing penalties struck by fullback Francois Steyn from well within his half that locally earned him the nick name of “Jet boots”.

2006 South Africa 21 New Zealand 20 (Rustenburg) -His great mate Martin Myers was at that game

This was one the filthiest Tests between these countries of the modern era. The Boks under Jake White and John Smit were dangling by a thread after five successive losses. One more and there would have been a clear-out ahead of the 2007 Word Cup. But the “gatvol” Boks threw all caution to the wind and scrapped out a win that was secured by a last-minute penalty goal by Andre PretoriusA year later that same Bok team won the World Cup!

By Mike Greenaway

Disappointed Springboks in agonising defeat to the All Blacks

The All Blacks win a humdinger of a test match

The disappointed Springboks rued ‘soft moments’ that cost them a famous double over world No 1 New Zealand, but came away with burgeoning self-belief, despite a heart-breaking two-point defeat (32-30) in a Castle Lager Rugby Championship clash at Loftus Versfeld in Pretoria on Saturday.

The Springboks held a 12-point advantage going into the final five minutes but the never-say-die All Blacks scored two converted tries in the dying moments of the game to claim a famous victory.

“For 70 minutes we did a lot of things right, but we had some soft moments and against the No 1 team in the world you can’t afford to do that,” said Siya Kolisi, Springbok captain.

“That’s probably where we lost it. I don’t think we deserved to lose but they really stuck to their game and perhaps we switched off for a split second.”

The teams both kicked two first half penalty goals to be tied at 6-6 at the break, but the Springboks scored three second half tries through Jesse Kriel, Damian de Allende and Cheslin Kolbe to take what appeared a commanding 30-13 lead with only a quarter of the match remaining.

Handre Pollard had been flawless from the kicking tee to kick six out of six for a personal haul of 15 points from three conversions and three penalty goals as the clock counted down on what appeared to be near certain victory.

However, tries by Rieko Ioane, Scott Barrett and Ardie Savea in the final 18 minutes – to add to an earlier score by Aaron Smith – stole victory for New Zealand.

Rassie Erasmus, Director of Rugby, said it was dangerous to talk about positives after a defeat but could not deny his satisfaction at the progress made by the team.

“I’m definitely happy with the progress and the growth we have shown,” Erasmus said. “South African rugby fans are not stupid and there will be criticism of this defeat, but we have shown growth and we will cling on to that.

“The last three games between us have been decided by no more than two points and when we run out against them now, the game can go either way. I’m proud we’ve got back to that position.

“It gives me hope that and belief that if we do a few things right we will be in with a real chance at the next year’s World Cup.”

Erasmus said that the deciding factor was probably New Zealand’s greater experience in tight games.

“I remember from when I was in Ireland, seeing New Zealand come back against the Irish from an impossible positon so I never thought the game was in the bag, even with five minutes to go,” he said.

“That’s New Zealand’s culture, that’s how they do things and that’s where we have to get to. We will learn from this.”

The Springboks are next in action against England at Twickenham on 3 November.

Issued by SA Rugby Communications

A Rugby score 16 -52 at Loftus and an unexpected surprise

THE last two occasions the Springboks hosted the All Blacks in Pretoria the visitors behaved rather rudely, trashing Loftus Versfeld to the tune of 16-52 in 2003 and three years later crushing Jake White’s Boks 45-26.

That opening statement written by my mate Mike Greenaway (16 -52 at Loftus ) inspired me to reflect on a wonderful by product that came out of that fateful day if you supported the Boks.

I was at the game -dressed in Black (All Black = think mad ! ) and I had beers thrown at me and my dear mate Rob Viviani who was with me had a smile all afternoon on his face as I coped abuse from 150kg men who drove bakkies and who thought I was fair game on the walk to the stadium . It was a glorious match.You could hear a pin drop at the final score .I remember walking back past those self same supporters who where a bit better oiled with klippies and coke and the odd beer to be greeted with the words -Julle Manne het goed gespeel -Drunk and gracious -what a combination

That evening I got phoned by my friend Samm Marshall who was on Good Hope FM at the time and asked to be on air on Sunday morning -to talk about the game …I loved this and had a good old cackle .

Good radio indeed -Good Hope loved the chirps and asked me to do a regular once a week chat on a Saturday. This went on for a number of months until Heart FM under the then direction of Selwyn Bartlett heard about the show and offered me a slot on Heart 104.9fm -To shorten the whole story On the Couch was invented or #OTC as it was called and this show ran till 2016 -We had fantastic presenters Fiona Furey ,the late great AZ Abrahams ,Peter Stemmet ,Sam Roy ,Rob Vember and then Tapfuma Makina .We first started with a 15min chat and then it went from 8-9am and then settled on 9 to 10am.

We had the good and the great on the show -The glorious time was during the 2007 World Cup in France ,We had regular crossings to Mike -The chats had color and depth and I think our French even improved.

Mike Greenway even went on to write John Smit’s book “Captain in the Cauldron” a best seller might I add and one of the sureal moments on radio was when the Cape Town book launch happened it was the night before the world cup draw 2010 -which took place on Friday night .We had arranged to speak to Mike on the Saturday as he was leaving to go back to Durban and when we called after about 2 sentences he gave the phone to John Smit and said you chat to him – Wild amazing radio totally off the cuff and unplanned – Smitty had also just done the world cup opening the night before .

I even got to be published for a few years and wrote for SA Rugby Magazine doing a Proust type questionaire .I got the names to do it: Andrew Merthens,Richie McCaw ,and all the top SA rugby players ,It was great fun ,this writing lasted for about 2 years.

I digress back to the rugby stories. Mike and I met at BMG records in 1996 at at music conference ,when the music business was the business ,I will never forget during the one talk by Dave Thompson (he of Idols fame ),Mike mentions ,”Mart cover for me ,I must do a quick phone interview with Mark Andrews ,my reply is ..uck he is a Springbok Rugby player and Mike says yes I also do rugby writing” .Well that sealed a friendship that is still going strong today .He is by far the best writer in the country ,not because he is my mate ,but because the color and opinion is so good and he is normally correct -The bugger ,but we still love him for that .

I remember one year going Durban with my girlfriend Razia (who became my wife ,this must have been 2008 or 2009 ) to see the mighty Sharks on a crest of a wave up against the Crusaders (my side ).McCaw had just come back from an injury layoff and Mike tells me your side stands no chance ,Well mighty McCaw dragged the Sharks around and single handily made mince meat of the Sharks ..I was furious with Green -telling me the Saders had no chance .

When my mom passed away in 2001 Mike and I made a pact we won’t miss All Black games -We have been to Rustenberg (Andre Pretorius saved the Boks bacon that day )
Bloemfontein and Durban for consecutive test matchs -All Blacks lost both and Boks became the number 1 side .We had great fun.even John Smit came to pick up Greenaway to continue writing the book he was doing and drove Greenaway back to Durban -I had the piss taken out of me because I had an All Black shirt on …

We have seen the AB’S in PE in 2011 -The AB’S lost and then last year at Newlands I saw a glorious win by 1 point -Who cares the Blacks won.

Stuart Rubin my great mate came to watch the Boks take it up the nought at Newlands 19 -nil ….What a weekend that was.

I have had Sipho Mabuse sing the SA national anthem at an All Black game at FNB Stadium -The Boks got smashed that day, but the anthem singing was the redeeming feature of the day .

So the motto is when I am at a game in SA the Boks sometimes win, but it wont happen this coming weekend 6 Oct 2018 -The ghost of van Riebeeck won’t appear ,but the AB’S will win by 15 points or more and Mike thank you pushing me all those years ago when my mom passed away -and saying we not missing an All Black game.

All Blacks building depth that is set to prove a game-changer at 2019 World Cup

Steve Hansen has used 55 All Blacks in 2017, and 44 of them on this northern tour. This does not apply to the Boks at present under Coetzee

As insurance policies go, Steve Hansen may just have a dandy a couple of years out from the next World Cup. The All Blacks have been better, for sure, but have they ever been deeper than they are right now?

It’s a legitimate question to ask as Hansen leads a 43-strong leviathan around France and the UK this November. They will briefly number 44 when Akira Ioane joins them from his Maori commitments in Bordeaux and then return to a more modest 37 following the Lyon midweeker, by which time the injured Jerome Kaino and a half-dozen Baabaas ring-ins will have jetted back to New Zealand.

The answer to the earlier question is almost certainly no. This may not be an All Blacks squad humming on all cylinders, a la the 2015 World Cup champions, or their 2016 successors, or even the 2013 perfect year men, but they are deeper than Voltaire, which could yet be the single most important advantage they hold over their global rivals heading towards Japan in 2019.

All Blacks coach Steve Hansen has taken the biggest All Blacks squad to the northern hemisphere.

Rugby is a brutal, gladiatorial game, and only getting more so. The professional level of the sport is played nigh on 10 months of the year, and it is exacting a massive toll. Injuries are becoming not just a part of the game, but the dominant factor any coach has to combat when preparing for a campaign of any sort.

France had 19 players officially unavailable for their test against the All Blacks at Stade de France, and that’s just nine games into the new Top 14 season. Clubs in the UK and France are already dealing with long-term injury lists as high as 15 or 16, with some struggling to put full squads on the park.

Of course Hansen knows this. And his 2017 campaign has been mapped out to reflect it. It’s no coincidence that the All Blacks added a Barbarians and midweek French XV match to their three mandated tests on this tour.

That created, in effect, two non-test matchups, and gave Hansen the ideal stage on which to run his dirty-dirties, or second-tier men. It’s all very well bringing people on tour for experience, but if you can give them legitimate international matches as well, then even better.

Ironically injuries in his own group have also helped Hansen further build his depth this year. He had seven top players either crocked or unavailable for personal reasons when he set out for London, and Kaino became the eighth when a knee injury forced him out after the Baabaas clash.

By manager Darren Shand’s count the All Blacks have used 55 players in and around their various engagements in 2017, and that is an unprecedented number.

It is also a number that won’t upset Hansen and assistant Ian Foster as they look to build a depth chart that their chasing rivals, such as England, Ireland, the Springboks and Australia, can only look at with envy.

The All Blacks have legitimate international quality three deep in probably every position bar halfback. And you can bet finding a successor to the departing Tawera Kerr-Barlow will be their No 1 priority in 2018.

“We’re trying to grow some more depth, and we’re doing that,” says Hansen. “People don’t understand just how tough it is when you first come into the All Blacks. They expect the result to be clinical and precise, but the reality is that’s not the case.

“Sometimes, particularly when you’ve got a young group, there is going to be inconsistency. You’ve just got to be patient and take your time. I know for a fact we’ll end up with some quality people [at the end of this tour] and have a good group to be able to select from in 2019.

“The key thing this year is we’ve had a number of injuries, suspensions and personal tragedies that have exposed a wider base than we probably thought we would do this year. But at the beginning of next year when everyone is available we should have a bigger pool to pick from, and more experienced people too which should give us a boost to the next level.’

Think about it. Bring back Ben Smith, Nehe Milner-Skudder, Israel Dagg and maybe even a rejuvenated Julian Savea, and suddenly you have all sorts of options in the back three. Same when you add Owen Franks and Joe Moody to the suddenly bulging prop stock.

Halfback is the only position where Hansen would have just a little concern. Maybe No 8 too, but there are not a lot of opportunities there behind the skipper.

At No 9, behind Aaron Smith and TJ Perrenara, he does not have an obvious backup. It’s why he brought Kerr-Barlow on one final tour, even though he is departing at its end.

But this is New Zealand rugby. That hole will be plugged soon enough. Mitchell Drummond has had a week with the Baabaas, and now one with the All Blacks. Brad Weber remains a contender. Same with Auggie Pulu and Bryn Hall. The national coaches just need to see more from them.

“We’re giving other people an opportunity to grow and get an understanding of what All Blacks rugby is about,” adds Hansen. “Northern tours have always been about bringing extra people so we can develop them. It’s a good platform, you’re in a touring environment where things are quite intense for a month, and you get a good look at the young guys.

“One of our big aims for the year was to expose young guys to touring, test match rugby and playing for the All Blacks. By the end of this season we would have done that in bulk.”

Have a look at this depth chart, and judge for yourself where Hansen’s All Blacks stand less than two years from the World Cup.

Sure, they’ve had a wobble or two, but simply no one – England included – can match them for depth.

ALL BLACKS’ DEPTH CHART

Fullback: Ben Smith, Jordie Barrett, Damian McKenzie, David Havili.

Wings: Rieko Ioane, Israel Dagg, Nehe Milner-Skudder, Waisake Naholo, Seta Tamanivalu, Matt Duffie, Julian Savea.

Midfield: Sonny Bill Williams, Ryan Crotty, Anton Liennert-Brown, Ngani Laumape, Jack Goodhue, Charlie Ngatai.

First fives: Beauden Barrett, Lima Sopoaga, Richie Mo’unga, Damian McKenzie.

Halfback: Aaron Smith, TJ Perenara.

Loose forwards: Kieran Read, Sam Cane, Liam Squire, Ardie Savea, Matt Todd, Vaea Fifita, Jerome Kaino, Akira Ioane, Luke Whitelock.

Locks: Brodie Retllick, Sam Whhitelock, Luke Romano, Scott Barrett, Patrick Tuipulotu, Dominic Bird.

Props: Owen Franks, Joe Moody, Nepo Laulala, Kane Hames, Wyatt Crockett, Ofa Tu’ungafasi, Tim Perry, Jeffery Toomaga-Allen, Atu Moli.

Hookers: Dane Coles, Codie Taylor, Nathan Harris, Asafo Aumua.

source Sunday Star Times

Pictures from Captains walk about at Newlands which featured the All Blacks today ahead of Saturday’s 7 October date with the Springboks

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